Spring Break in Taos: Part 5 – Globe to home

Be sure to read the previous posts to get some context for this one.  Some images can be clicked on to see them enlarged.

The morning in Globe was bright and sunny; good traveling weather.  This would be the last day on the road, but before we pulled out onto the highway and figuratively hollered “Westward Ho!” Cynthia had gathered some travel flyers and had discovered that right in Globe (almost) is a place called Besh Ba Gowah, a ruins attributed to the Salado people, descendents of Anasazi and Hohoakam cultures like many of the other pueblos in New Mexico but quite distinct… and, alas, extinct.

I’ve stayed in Globe on business doing a video for the big copper mine, but had never heard of it.  It sounded interesting and we had plenty of time now.

All that is known of the inhabitants is pieced together, literally, from artifacts and the remains of the ruins on the outskirts of Globe.  The ruins have been partially rebuilt or stabilized with a few houses restored and the grounds filled with native plants and flowers.  It is a quite lovely desert garden in addition to the archeological, anthropological attraction of the ruins.  I confess, it is a visual and historical treat that was, to me, totally unexpected.

A wall at the Ruins of Besh Ba Gowah, an ancient Salado pueblo site on the outskirts of Glove, AZ.  Canon 5D Mk II, Canon 17-40mm f4L

A wall at the Ruins of Besh Ba Gowah, an ancient Salado pueblo site on the outskirts of Glove, AZ. Canon 5D Mk II, Canon 17-40mm f4L

Some of the cactus patches are extensive and form an interesting if prickly pattern…

A stand of cactus in the ruins at Besh Ba Gowah is far more colorful than you might think.  Canon 5D Mk II, Sigma 50-500 f4

A stand of cactus in the ruins at Besh Ba Gowah is far more colorful than you might think. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigma 50-500 f4

One of the houses has been restored so visitors can see what it looked like inside.  Rooms were a place to sleep and get out of the weather but living and working were largely outdoor events so rooms are small.  Because it was easier to use in the cramped quarters I first took a shot with my little S120.  But with its auto settings, it picked up something human eyes do not see: an interesting mixed light coloration.

Behind me sunlight was coming in a door way; in front of me the light was all reflected from the earth toned adobe walls. The camera picked up this blue to brown mix.  It was so interesting that for the first time in its life, I set the 5D MkII in auto white balance mode to try to duplicate the effect the little camera had captured.

Inside a restored home at Besh Ba Gowah.  This was tricky balancing the heavy Sigma 50-500mm lens against a support beam for the long exposure.  Even with image stabilization it took 4 frames to get one (the 3rd) that was sharp.

Inside a restored home at Besh Ba Gowah. This was tricky balancing the heavy Sigma 50-500mm lens against a support beam for the long exposure. Even with image stabilization it took 4 frames to get one (the 3rd) that was sharp.  Canon 5D MkII, Sigma 50-500mm f4

Interestingly, the “good” camera did not pick up the effect as noticeably as its little point and shoot sibling.  I’m not sure why…

Outside that chamber on an exterior wall an old viga protruded and was weathering in the Arizona sun.  These people did not build with Adobe bricks as many of the New Mexican pueblos had learned to do.  Instead they maintained the ancient practice of building out of stacked stones,   But because these local stones were not so neatly flattened to stack nicely, they added  mud and adobe (mud mixed with a fiber such as straw or dried grasses) as a mortar to hold them together.

Detail showing the wall construction at Besh Ba Gowah.  Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

Detail showing the wall construction at Besh Ba Gowah. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

The visitor’s center had a drinking fountain with the sweetest cold water so with a long swig of that and a last minute pit stop, it was time to set a westerly bearing and hit the road.  Clear sailing ahead, Cap’n… wind to our backs and all sails set.  Even the top gallants are filled with energy.

But between Globe and Phoenix, however, is the Boyd Thompson Arboretum featuring an incredible array of flowering desert species all in one space.  I had been noticing some gorgeous cactus flowers in bloom the whole trip but frustratingly never saw one in a place easy (or legal) to pull over.  But here was a facility which raised and nurtured desert plants, so surely some good images would be lying in wait for us in there.  Lower the sails Mr. Smee and heave to.

And sure enough, within steps of the parking spot was this lovely example…

Cactus blossoms. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

Cactus blossoms. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

I really did not expect to spend much time here; you know, we’ve all done it — leap out, take a few shots, leap back in then hit the road again.  But the parking lot was FULL.  And the place was overflowing with people, many with some serious camera gear, enjoying this fantastic collection of desert flaura.  Hmmmmm… perhaps there is more here than just a few cactus plants flowering in the sun…

An hour later… we were finally getting ready to head out.  I have no idea what these various plants were, with the exception of the yellow columbine which surprised me to see it growing here, so I’ll just let you enjoy the beauty.

Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

No clue... but the bees weren't worried about what to call it... Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

No clue… but the bees weren’t worried about what to call it… Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

This cactus REALLY likes it here. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

This cactus REALLY likes it here. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

Not a cactus but this columbine really surprised my growing here .  Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

Not a cactus but this columbine really surprised my growing here . Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

Until I moved here to teach I had no idea how beautiful the cactus varieties could be when in bloom. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

Until I moved here to teach I had no idea how beautiful the cactus varieties could be when in bloom. Canon 5D Mk II, Sigmal 50-500mm f4

But now we really did have to get on the road to get home by evening.  So from there, this time, we headed straight home.  Long drive but arrived safely and now begins the task to edit and assemble the shots that, ironically, if you have read this far… you have already seen.  Wow, the magic of the web!  We outscored that dang bear one more time and it was last seen sitting in a hot tub licking its wounds, planning on how to deal with the next trek.

But it turns out that I’ve still got some shots that didn’t seem to fit well into the narrative or which were left over after the selected ones were used, but which I would still like to show.   So-o-o-o-o, there will be one more small post related to the trip that will present miscellaneous shots I did not know where else to fit into the narrative but which I am pleased to show you.

So if I have not bored you to death so far, stand by, there is one more post from this trip coming…

Advertisements

About ndking

Commercial Photographer and Professor of Photography at San Diego City College
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s